Quince paste (membrillo)

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By: Gioconda Scott From: Gioconda Scott's Paradise Kitchen

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This recipe is classed as intermediate

Rating 2.27 / 5 (49 votes)

Prep time:
20 min
Cook time:
35 min
Serves:
Makes approx 1.5kg of quince jelly

Try Gioconda Scott's recipe for home-made Membrillo or Spanish quince paste, traditionally eaten with cheese such as Manchego

Method

1. Place the chopped quince and cinnamon stick in a preserving pan or large, wide stainless steel or lined aluminium saucepan.

2. Add the salt and pour in enough water to cover the chopped quince.

3. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes until the quince is tender. Remove and discard the cinnamon stick.

4. In a food processor or blender process the quince mixture until completely smooth.

5. Return the quince puree to the pan and gradually add the sugar.

6. Cook stirring over a low heat until the mixture thickens into a sticky paste and takes on a caramel colour, around 20 minutes.

7. Pour the quince paste into a lightly greased tray and let it cool and set.

Ingredients

  • 1 kg quince, peeled, cored and chopped
  • Half a cinnamon sticks
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 kg sugar

Tips and suggestions

Pork Chops with Membrillo Sauce

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Latest Comment

 

You certaintly don't want to throw away the best bit! - the 'water' you use for boiling the quince should be used to make quince jelly. just add the same volume of sugar, boil for 20 minutes and put into jars. It's a beautiful pink shade.

As for the membrillo, it's best to completely drain it (through a muslim back) collecting all the juice for your jelly, before weighing it and adding the same weight in sugar. Needs about an hour on the stove, stirring all the time, before finishing in the oven at 50°C. Great with Pyrenean sheep's cheese!

SimonO70195 SimonO70195  Posted 06 Oct 2011 10:52 AM
 

Sue, you dont drain it from the water, also depending on how much water you have will determine how long to boil down. It is very spluttery to make but u want a very thick paste. i useully pack it in wide neck small kilner jars so i can just turn it out in one small piece and serve with goats cheese. Not sure how long it keeps but i have kept it for a couple of months in a cold store room.
Well worth making.

DoloresM91464 DoloresM91464  Posted 19 Nov 2010 8:53 AM
 

Sue, you dont drain it from the water, also depending on how much water you have will determine how long to boil down. It is very spluttery to make but u want a very thick paste. i useully pack it in wide neck small kilner jars so i can just turn it out in one small piece and serve with goats cheese. Not sure how long it keeps but i have kept it for a couple of months in a cold store room.
Well worth making.

DoloresM91464 DoloresM91464  Posted 19 Nov 2010 8:52 AM
 

Not clear whether cooked quince should be drained from water first before blending. Also, cooking to a pulp takes at least an hour of spluttery boiling and then the mixture doesn't actually "set" but forms a thick paste

SueR78899 SueR78899 Posted 24 Oct 2010 6:14 PM
 

would have been a good idea to add storage instructions. Have not tried this recipe because of this

assan assan Posted 18 Oct 2008 8:25 PM